Tag Archives: wine trivia

Wine as medicine

imagesWine and health is an issue of considerable discussion and research. Wine has a long history of use as an early form of medication, being recommended variously as a safe alternative to drinking water, and antiseptic, for treating wounds, a digestive aid, and as a cure for a wide range of ailments including lethargy, diarrhea, and pain from child birth.

Ancient Egyptian Papyri and Sumerian tablets dating back to 2200 BC detail the medicinal role of wine, making it the world’s oldest documented man-made medicine.[2] Wine continued to play a major role in medicine until the late 19th and early 20th century, when changing opinions and medical research on alcohol and alcoholism cast doubt on the role of wine as part of a healthy lifestyle and diet.

In the late 20th and early 21st century, fueled in part by public interest in reports by the United States news broadcast 60 minutes on the so-called “French Paradox”, the medical establishment began to re-evaluate the role of moderate wine consumption in health.

Early medicine was intimately tied with religion and the supernatural, with early practitioners often being priests and magicians. Wine’s close association with ritual made it a logical tool for these early medical practices. Tablets from Sumerian culture and papyri from Ancient Egypt dating to 2200 BC include recipes for wine based medicines, making wine the oldest documented man made medicine.

250px-Château_Lafite_Rothschild_and_glassThe French Paradox

The 1990s and early 21st century saw a renewed interest in the health benefits of wine, ushered in by increasing research suggesting that moderate wine drinkers have lower mortality rates than heavy drinkers or teetotalers*. In November 1991, the U.S. news program 60 Minutes aired a broadcast on the so-called “French Paradox”. Featuring the research work of Bordeaux scientist Serge Renaud, the broadcast dealt with the seemingly paradoxical relationship between the high fat/high dairy diets of French people and the low occurrence of cardiovascular disease among them. The broadcast drew parallels to the American and British diets which also contained high levels of fat and dairy but which featured high incidences of heart disease. One of the theories proposed by Renaud in the broadcast was that moderate consumption of red wine was a risk-reducing factor for the French and that wine could have more positive health benefits yet to be studied. Following the 60 Minutes broadcast, sales of red wine in the United States jumped 44% over previous years.

And so, based on all the above ;), I consider drinking a daily glass of wine my beauty régime, and believe me, it’s working ;)! Santé**!!! 🙂

Thank you, Wikipedia, for all this information!

*Teetolars are people who don’t drink alcohol

**Santé – French for Health!, in other words, ‘to (your) Health’!

 

 

Wine Quiz (4)

475396,1326227577,2Here are some odd but interesting questions and their answers — knowledge you don’t really need to have ;), although such trivia does make life more interesting!

Q.1 — What is the longest recorded flight of a champagne cork?

Q.2 — What is the name of the dimple at the bottom of a wine bottle?

Q.3 — On which day and month is the Beaujolais Nouveau (New Burgundy Wine) officially released for sale each year?

Q.4 — Decanting wine is done for what two purposes?

Q.5 — During Prohibition, what one specific purpose were wines made for?

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A. 1 — 177 feet 9 inches

A.2 — The punt

A.3 — The third Thursday in November

A.4 — Separating sediment and for aerating the wine, popularly known as letting the wine breathe

A.5 –Sacramental wine

I’ll leave you all with an interesting quote by novelist Robert Louis Stevenson: “Wine is bottled poetry!” Anyone disagree? 😉

 

Information we don’t need – Wine Quiz 3 ;)

2014-01-09 16_53_43Here are some more wine related fun facts — simply fun, not necessary for survival or anything serious 🙂

Questions:

Q1. Who said: “Champagne wishes, and caviar dreams”?

Q2. Which five celebrities have wine bottled under their own name?

Q3. Wine bottled by which celebrity couple won a prize in France in 2013?

Q4. Who said, “Penicillin may cure human beings, but it is wine that makes them happy”?

Q5. What would you call a person who appreciates and/or collects wine?

Drum roll, please…for the answers 🙂

A1. Robin Leach, the entertainment celebrity reporter and writer used to wish people ‘Champagne wishes, and caviar dreams’!

A2. Francis Ford Coppola, Dan Ackroyd, Wayne Gretzky, Kyle McLaughlin, Drew Bledsoe, Mario Andretti, and Greg Norman.

A3. A rosé wine named Jolie-Pitt & Perrin Côtes de Provence Rosé Miraval, No. 84 has been placed by the renowned wine magazine Wine Spectator on its list of the top 100 wines of 2013. And yes, “Jolie-Pitt” is really in the name, referring to Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie. The wine was ranked the highest of any rosé on the list, essentially making it Wine Spectator’s best rosé in the world.

A4. Sir Alexander Fleming, who discovered penicillin. He was a Scottish biologist, pharmacologist and botanist.

A5. An Oenophile*.

*Pronounced Een-e-file, a person who greatly loves wine and studies it.